Jan 202010

 

Seagulls stake out prime beachfront property, especially on stormy days.

Seagulls stake out prime beachfront property, especially on stormy days.

Well, it’s been more than a week since I last posted. Now, back in Los Angeles, I had some catching up to do and a bead show to attend (Pasadena Bead and Design Show). While I was at the show, I met Khan of MineGem. His booth, a rainbow of color, instantly drew me in. He sells natural crystals as well as precious and semiprecious gemstone necklaces. I bought a few strands from him (faceted garnet, apatite, black onyx and emerald briolettes). Best of all, though, he spent time with me discussing jewelry and stones — years of accumulated knowledge there. When I walked away from his booth, I took with me much more than beautiful stones. How much inspiration can you possibly stand?

Now that I’ve sorted through my images and — finally — figured out how to upload them with a little help from my boyfriend, Oz (thanks, Oz), I can revisit my mornings on the Oregon Coast.

Mussel shells on the beach always remind me of bits of broken fine china.

Mussel shells on the beach always remind me of bits of broken fine china.

 

 

On my last agate hunt, the ocean was kind to me. The tide was at last low enough at the right time of day (not dark), that I was able to get around to the cove without fear of being swept out to sea. Camera shoved deep into my coat pocket to protect it from rocks and rain, I scrambled over the boulders, around to my favorite spot. The rocks were so deep on the beach, it was like walking through snow. But I knew the tide would be out for a while so I could take my time without the threat of getting trapped. With no other human in sight, the powder-gray gulls were my only companions.

The waterfalls enroute to the cove were in full gush mode, thanks to recent storms.

The waterfalls enroute to the cove were in full gush mode, thanks to recent storms.

 

 

My first step off a boulder onto the rocky beach was rewarded with a huge honey-colored agate. One of the largest I’ve found yet. Basically, everywhere I looked I could see the telltale sparkle of agates, even under the slate-gray sky. Most of them here have been no more than an inch long, but I ended up with several fat ones that  stretched to 2 inches. I also lined my pockets with brilliantly colored jasper and a few carnelians. All good pendant sizes. This was fortuitous for the afternoon’s activities.

I made it home in time to peel off my wet jeans, put on dry ones and brush my tangled hair. Then I was off to Depot Bay, destination: Root’s Beads (Rootsbeads.com), to take a class in wirewrapping from master jeweler, Sheila Root. Though I’ve been doing some basic wirewraps for a little while, there were aspects of it that puzzled me concerning tidy pendant wrapping. Sheila unlocked these mysteries for me during two hours at her beautiful shop. From Highway 101, her place looks unassuming, but when you walk through the door, you’re  hit with color on a grand scale. This former college professor, it seems, has never been a stranger to jewelry. She inherited her sizable tool arsenal from her father, who was a jeweler. She knows what it is jewelry designers want. If you’re ever in this part of the world, be sure to stop in here. Stones, findings, books and pretty much any kind of glass crystal you can think of. And the people there are friendly and helpful. They sell kites, too.

You can find darn near anything you need for jewelry design at Root's Beads.

You can find darn near anything you need for jewelry design at Root's Beads.

 

 

If you’re into stones and natural crystals, another place to check out in nearby Gleneden Beach is the Crystal Wizard. This place is magical. Wonderful atmosphere, and they sell single undrilled stones — almost every kind you can imagine. Since I am interested in learning about stones, I was in heaven and spent over an hour choosing little samples of everything from Celestite and Mangano Calcite to Emerald and Blue Aragonite — all at very affordable prices. They were also nice enough to label everything for me, to remind me what each stone is. Gotta learn somehow. Right?

The first glimpse of the cove and its waterfall after a climb over slick boulders. To find agates on this beach, the best strategy I found is to walk very slowly.So many rocks, so little time.

The first glimpse of the cove and its waterfall after a climb over slick boulders. To find agates on this beach, the best strategy I found is to walk very slowly. So many rocks, so little time.

 

 

All the rock hunting and info intake left me starving. By around 4 pm dinner was sounding really good. I grabbed my mom and we headed for town. In a small beach town like Lincoln City, you wouldn’t think you’d find much in the way of sophisticated cuisine, let alone Thai cuisine, but there are actually two really good Thai places along the 101.

Chalcedony isn't the only fascinating rock formation hidden away in the cove. These seastacks stand guard over its treasures like silent sentinels.

Chalcedony isn't the only fascinating rock formation hidden away in the cove. These seastacks stand guard over its treasures like silent sentinels.

Before I left, we tried them both. The Jasmine in the center of town, has comfy booths and excellent homemade coconut ice cream. The Andaman, across from the library, is quite elegant, serves great food (I couldn’t get enough of the green curry with tofu), and one of the owners, Patana, is a jewelry designer and metalsmith. One slow afternoon, earlier in my trip, I had fun talking jewelry with her.

 

I was sorry when I finally had to head back to L.A. I cushioned the blow by visiting the Pier Avenue Rock Shop (pieraverockshop.com) in Tierra del Mar, north of Lincoln City. I brought some of my beach collection in for owner, Lee King, to inspect. He helped me identify several.

Pier Avenue Rock Shop in Tierra del Mar is a rock hunter's dream.

Pier Avenue Rock Shop in Tierra del Mar is a rock hunter's dream.

Of course, in return, I had to buy a few particularly colorful agates from other parts of the Northwest, along with a piece of Biggs Jasper that has some really striking inclusions in it. Lee’s all about everything involving rocks/minerals, crystals — rock hunting, in general, which he considers, “Fun stuff.”

When it comes to agates, Lee King can help you sort out your clouds from your blacks.

When it comes to agates, Lee King can help you sort out your clouds from your blacks.

Not just a collector, he cuts slabs and cabochons of stellar beauty, and his shelves are overflowing with all sorts of stones, rough and polished. If you’re a rock hound, this shop, located along the stunningly beautiful Three Capes Loop, is definitely worth a visit.

 

 

I already miss my mornings on the beach, in the rain. But I know it will still be there for me, the next time I get the chance to hop a plane. I mean, I left my beading board there, so I have to go back soon. Right?

The translucent honey color of this large agate caught my eye the minute I stepped down from the boulders onto the beach.

The translucent honey color of this large agate caught my eye the minute I stepped down from the boulders onto the beach.

 

To find agates, slowing down is key.

To find agates, slowing down is key.

 

Amid smaller agates, the red jasper, in the lower right corner, lights up this shot.

Amid smaller agates, the red jasper, in the lower right corner, lights up this shot.

 

 

Where are the agates?

Where are the agates?

2 Responses to “Light Rain Couldn’t Put A Damper on Last Hunt”

  1. If you want a fix of Agates of the Oregon Coast, check out our blog of treasures that our guest have shared with us to share with you! One of the best entries is the very first entry of the blog (the largest and most beautiful BLUE agate). Did you get your copy of the new pocket guide Agates of the Oregon Coast yet?

    Sorry you had to go back to California, maybe you will be able to live on the Oregon Coast later.

    • Hey There K.: Thanks so much for the link to your wonderful blog. Yes, that’s an amazing blue agate, and with streaks of pyrite? It must be beautiful! Love the video of Roads End also. And yes, I do have the pocket guide, it’s one of my bibles. Don’t they say “location, location, location”? California has its charms, but I’ll always be an Oregon Coastie at heart, and I do hope to get to live there one of these days.
      Thanks again,
      Becky

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