About the Name

Posted by Rebecca Stone on March 8, 2010
Mar 082010

Inclusions in stones might be considered flaws by some, especially those chasing perfection. But it’s the imperfections that I am drawn to. Inclusions tell the story of the formation of a gemstone. They are its biography. Its beauty mark. They endow stones with character, personality, uniqueness and rare beauty. Inclusions mean that some other mineral, element or event (such as a fracture) has been included or trapped inside a stone during its development.

So many great stones to wrap, so little time. Here, agate and jasper show off their wonderful patterns.

So many great stones to wrap, so little time. Here, agate and jasper show off their wonderful patterns.

I’m no geologist (and I definitely have a lot to learn), but, I can’t help it: Clear quartz shot through with golden needles of rutile, black splinters of tourmaline or green shafts of actinolite or chlorite is magical;

Like spun gold, spikes of rutile add a touch of glamour to clear quartz.

Like spun gold, spikes of rutile add a touch of glamour to clear quartz.

inclusions in various jaspers create miniature works of art; moss agate, illustrated with green tendrils formed by inclusions of other minerals, resembles a tiny garden or bouquet; aventurine, spangled with inclusions of mica, shimmers like green satin embroidered with white gold; the black inclusions (stemming probably from a black mica matrix) in a rough, natural emerald punctuate the characteristic green shades in a way no 24-karat setting ever can.

What looks like organic greenery inside a moss agate is actually a mineral inclusion.

What looks like organic greenery inside a moss agate is actually a mineral inclusion.

Black inclusions add drama to a blue-green natural emerald.

Black inclusions add drama to a blue-green natural emerald.

Let’s face it, perfection is, for most of us, unattainable. And who needs it anyway? I believe that, just like human beings, stones that have been touched by life are much more interesting. And that’s why I love using them in my jewelry designs.

As I continue down this road, I’d love to hear of the experiences of others in regard to stones and jewelry design. And, if I get something wrong, please feel free to chime in about that too. This blog reflects a journey of discovery, and I love the idea of sharing knowledge about the art and craft of and jewelry design. And, with a name like “Inclusions,” this blog is designed to examine a wide range of topics.

Bands of quartz enhance the beauty of this amethyst nugget.

Bands of quartz enhance the beauty of this amethyst nugget.

Thanks for reading!

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